Waste Feasibility Study

Less Waste, More Resources: The future of waste management in our region

The Shire of Augusta Margaret River has commissioned an independent Feasibility Study to look at the future of waste management and resource recovery for the region. In the next few years, our landfill is reaching its capacity. Before it gets to that point, we are looking at how we currently manage waste in the region and how we can do it better.

The scope of the Study is wide ranging and over the next six months the Shire will be engaging with the local community, industry and experts in waste management to develop a suitable system to process our waste. This model will form the Waste Master Plan and will enable us to transition from landfill to resource recovery.

As a community member, this is a unique opportunity to tell us your ideas, to have input into how we manage our waste, to rethink its use as a resource and discover the options for doing it better. As the study progresses, the community will be invited to provide input at various stages of the project. Engagement will be primarily through on-line surveys, individual stakeholder interviews with key industry, business and community representatives, and community workshops.

At the end of the process, the Shire will consider two proposed models which will then be presented to the community.

Work on the study has commenced and will be completed by September 2018. We look forward to engaging with you in the near future.

Less Waste, More Resources: The future of waste management in our region

The Shire of Augusta Margaret River has commissioned an independent Feasibility Study to look at the future of waste management and resource recovery for the region. In the next few years, our landfill is reaching its capacity. Before it gets to that point, we are looking at how we currently manage waste in the region and how we can do it better.

The scope of the Study is wide ranging and over the next six months the Shire will be engaging with the local community, industry and experts in waste management to develop a suitable system to process our waste. This model will form the Waste Master Plan and will enable us to transition from landfill to resource recovery.

As a community member, this is a unique opportunity to tell us your ideas, to have input into how we manage our waste, to rethink its use as a resource and discover the options for doing it better. As the study progresses, the community will be invited to provide input at various stages of the project. Engagement will be primarily through on-line surveys, individual stakeholder interviews with key industry, business and community representatives, and community workshops.

At the end of the process, the Shire will consider two proposed models which will then be presented to the community.

Work on the study has commenced and will be completed by September 2018. We look forward to engaging with you in the near future.

Survey: Residential Waste

Thank you for taking the time to participate in the Waste Feasibility Study. Our goal is to find a sustainable waste management model that will address the needs of our community.  

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3. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low), how would you rate your knowledge of what items belong in the recycle bin? * required
4. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low), how would you rate your efforts to put items in the recycling bin. * required
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14 (A) Kerbside Collection Models

The Shire's current kerbside collection system consists of two bins; a green lid general waste bin collected weekly where all the contents go directly to landfill and a yellow lid recycling bin collected fortnightly which is transported to Perth for sorting and baling. The following three scenarios are options that we are exploring as part of the feasibility study. A recent waste classification audit found that over 50% of the material in our waste bins is organic waste which can be reprocessed. All options presented look at the introduction of an organics bin. All residents are asked to participate in this section of the survey as we are looking at expanding the service to all areas.

Scenario 1: 2 Bin System, Organics and 'Other' - Bin 1 - Organics only (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo), weekly collection Bin 2 - 'Other' – Loose recycling and any other general waste (put in a sealed bag), fortnightly or weekly collection. The first scenario looks at utilising our existing bins in a different way. The ‘other bin’ will require residents to put all general waste in sealed bags before placing them in the bin with their clean, loose recyclables. The green lid bin will be for organics only. This model allows organics to be collected without putting an additional collection vehicle on the road or supplying an additional bin, which can lead to increased costs and have an environmental impact. For this scenario to work residents will need to take ownership of their waste to ensure source separation is done correctly and contamination is minimised. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low) how willing would you be to separate items in the following way *
Scenario 1: 2 Bin System, Organics and 'Other' - Bin 1 - Organics only (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo), weekly collection Bin 2 - 'Other' – Loose recycling and any other general waste (put in a sealed bag), fortnightly or weekly collection. The first scenario looks at utilising our existing bins in a different way. The ‘other bin’ will require residents to put all general waste in sealed bags before placing them in the bin with their clean, loose recyclables. The green lid bin will be for organics only. This model allows organics to be collected without putting an additional collection vehicle on the road or supplying an additional bin, which can lead to increased costs and have an environmental impact. For this scenario to work residents will need to take ownership of their waste to ensure source separation is done correctly and contamination is minimised. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low) how willing would you be to separate items in the following way 5 4 3 2 1
Be diligent in ensuring that all those in your household are sorting waste correctly
Put all organics (eg. food, garden waste, paper, dog poo) into a separate bin with no contaminates (eg. plastic bags, food packaging, glass)
Put all recycling clean and loose into the 'other' bin
Bag up any general waste items that do not fall into the category of organics or recycling and place the sealed bag in the 'other' bin
Ensure any nappies and / or sanitary items are placed into a sealed bag before placing them into the 'other' bin
Scenario 2: 3 Bin System, Organics, Recycling and General Waste - Bin 1 - Organics only (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo), weekly collection Bin 2 – Recycling only, fortnightly collection Bin 3 – All other general waste, fortnightly collection, smaller bin (120L) The second scenario follows the model of many metropolitan councils where the Shire adds a 3rd bin to the current system. In this scenario, an additional service has been added which means that an additional bin needs to be supplied and an additional collection vehicle needs to be on the road to service the bins. There will be an increase in service fees as a result of the additional requirements. For this model residents will still need to sort their waste, however it is a more traditional method of source separation. Visitors to the region will also be familiar with this bin system as it is common throughout Australia. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low) how willing would you be to do the following - *
Scenario 2: 3 Bin System, Organics, Recycling and General Waste - Bin 1 - Organics only (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo), weekly collection Bin 2 – Recycling only, fortnightly collection Bin 3 – All other general waste, fortnightly collection, smaller bin (120L) The second scenario follows the model of many metropolitan councils where the Shire adds a 3rd bin to the current system. In this scenario, an additional service has been added which means that an additional bin needs to be supplied and an additional collection vehicle needs to be on the road to service the bins. There will be an increase in service fees as a result of the additional requirements. For this model residents will still need to sort their waste, however it is a more traditional method of source separation. Visitors to the region will also be familiar with this bin system as it is common throughout Australia. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low) how willing would you be to do the following - 5 4 3 2 1
Put all organics (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo) into the green-lid bin with no contaminates (plastic bags, food packaging, glass)
Put all recycling clean and loose into the yellow-lid recycling bin
Put only items which cannot be composted or recycled in the red-lid general waste bin
Pay additional fees to have a third bin
Scenario 3: 2 Bin System, Organics and General Waste – Bin 1 - Organics only (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo), weekly collection. Bin 2 – General waste only, fortnightly collection. Recycling is not collected from the kerbside. The final scenario considers the uncertainty of viable recycling markets and the introduction of the Container Deposit Scheme (CDS). CDS will enable Western Australians to return common recyclable items to reverse vending machines for a 10 cent per item refund. With this program taking a significant portion of materials out of the recycling stream the model would remove the recycling bin from the kerbside collection. In order to continue recycling residents would be expected to take their items to either a CDS machine or to Shire provided drop-off points. This model saves on transport and would likely not impact service fees but would rely heavily on residents to be responsible for their own recycling. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low) how willing would you be to do the following - *
Scenario 3: 2 Bin System, Organics and General Waste – Bin 1 - Organics only (food, garden waste, paper, dog poo), weekly collection. Bin 2 – General waste only, fortnightly collection. Recycling is not collected from the kerbside. The final scenario considers the uncertainty of viable recycling markets and the introduction of the Container Deposit Scheme (CDS). CDS will enable Western Australians to return common recyclable items to reverse vending machines for a 10 cent per item refund. With this program taking a significant portion of materials out of the recycling stream the model would remove the recycling bin from the kerbside collection. In order to continue recycling residents would be expected to take their items to either a CDS machine or to Shire provided drop-off points. This model saves on transport and would likely not impact service fees but would rely heavily on residents to be responsible for their own recycling. On a scale of 1 to 5 (where 5 is very high and 1 is very low) how willing would you be to do the following - 5 4 3 2 1
Continue to recycle if you did not have the convenience of a kerbside collection
Sort specified recyclable items out of your household waste and take them to reverse vending machines for a rebate.
Take all recyclable items to drop-off stations
Put all organics (eg. food, garden waste, paper, dog poo) into a separate bin with no contaminates (eg. plastic bags, food packaging, glass)
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Demographics

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